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Verbs - Irregular Past Tense - 3

Verbs - Irregular Past Tense - 3

 

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Irregular Past – 3


Hello! In a previous lesson, we were introduced to five groups of irregular verbs. We learned that the verbs can be grouped according to the changes that take place in the formation of the simple past tense.

Now that we have learned how to form the simple past tenses of several groups of verbs, let us listen to the dialog.

Jennifer:  David, did you sleep well?

David:  Yes, I slept well. I want some coffee. Did you make some coffee?

Jennifer:  You slept well? I did not sleep well.

David: Why did you sleep badly?

Jennifer: We had a big storm last night. Did you hear it?

David:  We had a big storm? No, I did not hear it. Did you make coffee?

Jennifer:  You slept well because you did not hear the storm. I did not sleep well because I heard the storm. Did you make coffee?

David: No, I did not make coffee. Did you make coffee?

Jennifer: I did not make coffee, but I really want some.

Now that we have heard the dialog, let us look more carefully at the sentences.

Jennifer starts the conversation by asking "David, did you sleep well?". We notice that the question has the signal word "did", and therefore the answer will be in the simple past tense. Jennifer might also have asked "How did you sleep?".

David answers "Yes, I slept well. I want some coffee. Did you make some coffee?". Since David's answer is in the affirmative, he must use the past tense form. The past tense of the verb "sleep is "slept", so David's answer is "Yes, I slept well.".  He could have answered with a short form:  "Yes I did.".

David says that he wants some coffee and asks "Did you make some coffee?". We notice that the question has the signal word "did", and therefore the answer will be in the simple past tense.

Jennifer responds "You slept well?  I did not sleep well.". In the first part of her utterance, she mirrors David statement" You slept well?". Notice that she uses the simple past tense form "slept" in her utterance. In the second part of her statement, she says "I did not sleep well.". Since her statement is negative, she uses the auxiliary verb "did", the negative "not", and the base form of the verb, "sleep":  "I did not sleep well".  

David asks "Why did you sleep badly?".We notice the signal word "did" that this is a past tense question.  The answer will be in the simple past tense.

Jennifer does not answer the question directly. Rather she answers with another sentence in the simple past tense. "We had a big storm last night.". She might have said "I slept badly last night because we had a big storm.". We notice that the verb "had" is in the simple past tense.

Jenifer adds "Did you hear it?".She might have asked "Did you hear the big storm?". Since we see the signal word "did" we know that the question is in the simple past tense.

David replies to her question with a mirror statement: "We had a big storm?". Since his utterance is not put in question form, he uses the simple past tense: "had".  He then answers Jennifer's question: "No, I did not hear it.". Because his statement is negative, he uses the familiar "did not" and the base form of the verb. "No I did not hear it.". He could have used the short answer "No, I did not.". He then reiterates his original question "Did you make coffee?". We notice that the question has the signal word "did", and therefore the answer will be in the simple past tense.

Jennifer sums up the situation with two sentences:  "You slept well because you did not hear the storm. I did not sleep well because I heard the storm.". We notice that in the affirmative portions "you slept" and "I heard", she uses the simple past tense forms. And we notice that in the negative portions of her sentences, she uses the form "did not": "did not hear" and "did not sleep".   She then repeats the theme question of the dialog: "Did you make coffee?".

David gives the first answer to the theme question: "No I did not make coffee.". Since it is in the negative, it has the words "did not" with the base form of the verb, "make". He could have answered, "No, I did not.".  And, as if he had not heard his own answer to Jennifer's question , he asks Jennifer "Did you make coffee?".

Jennifer repeats the same answer "I did not make coffee" and adds "but I really want some.". She might have said "but I really want some coffee.".

Now that we have heard the dialog and learned how to use these verbs in the simple past tense, let us listen to the dialog again. Listen for the difference between the affirmative and negative answers in the simple past tense.

Jennifer:  David, did you sleep well?

David:  Yes, I slept well. I want some coffee. Did you make some coffee?

Jennifer:  You slept well? I did not sleep well.

David: Why did you sleep badly?

Jennifer: We had a big storm last night. Did you hear it?

David:  We had a big storm? No, I did not hear it. Did you make coffee?

Jennifer:  You slept well because you did not hear the storm. I did not sleep well because I heard the storm. Did you make coffee?

David: No, I did not make coffee. Did you make coffee?

Jennifer: I did not make coffee, but I really want some.

Great work! You are making excellent progress in English. Your ability in English is increasing, and you are learning some very useful and common past tense forms. You are able to discuss activities in the past, present, and future. You are able to discuss problems and hypothetical issues. Now incorporate these irregular past tense forms into your growing repertoire in English as you carry on conversations with your English-speaking friends and colleagues.