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Verbs - Irregular Past Tense - 4

Verbs - Irregular Past Tense - 4

 

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Irregular Past – 4

 

 

Hello! In this lesson, we will learn to use more of the irregular past tenses. In previous lessons, we have covered several of the irregular simple past tense forms. As we learned earlier, we must memorize the irregular past tenses because there is no way to predict how the past tenses will be formed.

In this lesson, we will work with some verbs that have miscellaneous internal vowel changes in their past tenses. The simple past tense of the verb "to come" is "came".  Jennifer might ask David "What time did you come home last night?". An answer might be "I came home after midnight.".

The simple past tense of the verb "to lose" is "lost". David might tell Jennifer "I lost my car keys again!". Jennifer might ask him "Where did you lose them?".

The simple past tense of the verb "to run" is "ran". Mr. Johnson might look at David one morning and ask "Did you run to work?". On a day when his car is in the shop, David might answer "Yes, I ran to work this morning.".

The simple past tense of the verb "to say" is "said.".When they are talking on the phone, Jennifer might ask David "What did you say? I can't hear you!". David might answer "I said I will be home on time!".  Which means (translate: I will be home on time!)

The simple past tense of the verb "to sit" is "sat.". David might ask "You worked hard today! Did you sit down at all?". Jennifer might answer "I sat down for five minutes.".

The simple past tense of "to stand" is "stood".  Similarly, the simple past tense of the verb "to understand" is "understood". David might ask Jennifer "Did you understand the international visitors?" Jennifer might say "Yes, I understood them.

The simple past tense of the verb "to pay" is "paid". This verb is regular in pronunciation, but irregular in spelling.

Now that we have learned some irregular past tense forms, let us listen to the dialog.

David:  I lost my car keys again.

Jennifer:  You lose them every day. Where did you lose them?

David:  Hmm, I came into the kitchen …

Jennifer:  You stood at the table …

David:  Hmm …Did I sit down?

Jennifer: Yes! You sat down in the living room!

David:  Aha! My keys are in the living room!

Jennifer:  You lose your keys every day, but …

David:  … then I find them!

David starts the conversation by announcing "I lost my car keys again.".  We notice that David uses the irregular past tense "lost", the past tense of "to lose". As with any of the simple past tenses, this form would be the same for any subject. For example, we would say "David lost his car keys again." or "We lost our car keys again." or "You lost your car keys again.".

Jennifer says "You lose them every day. Where did you lose them?". Jennifer uses the simple present tense in the first part of her utterance. In the second part of her utterance, she asks David "Where did you lose them?" Remember that when we ask a question in the simple past tense, we use the signal word "did" and the base form of the verb. In this case, the base form is "lose".

David answers "Hmm, I came into the kitchen …" David uses the irregular past tense form "came", which is the simple past tense form of the verb "to come." As with any of the simple past tenses, this form would be the same for any subject. For example, we would say "Jennifer came into the kitchen." or "We came into the kitchen." or "You came into the kitchen.".

Jennifer says "You stood at the table …". Jennifer uses the simple past tense for, of the verb "to stand", which is "stood".  As with any of the simple past tenses, this form would be the same for any subject. For example, we would say "Jennifer stood at the table." or "You stood at the table." or "We stood at the table.".

David tries to remember if he sat down. He asks "Did I sit down?" We notice that David uses the word "did" to signal the past tense. He uses the base form of the verb "to sit" whose base form is "sit".

Jennifer responds "Yes, you sat down in the living room!". We see that Jennifer uses the simple past tense form of the verb "to sit" which is "sat". As with any of the simple past tenses, this form would be the same for any subject. For example, we would say "David sat down in the living room." or "We sat down in the living room." or "I sat down in the living room.".

Jennifer and David wrap up David's daily plight by stating an everyday recurring truth in the simple present tense: "You lose your keys every day, but …   …then I find them!".

Now that we have examined the sentences of the dialog, let us listen to it again. Listen for instances of the simple past tense.

David:  I lost my car keys again.

Jennifer:  You lose them every day. Where did you lose them?

David:  Hmm, I came into the kitchen …

Jennifer:  You stood at the table …

David:  Hmm …Did I sit down?

Jennifer: Yes! You sat down in the living room!

David:  Aha! My keys are in the living room!

Jennifer:  You lose your keys every day, but …

David:  … then I find them!

Wonderful! You have added more irregular past tenses to your repertoire. Memorization of these past tenses will be easier if you practice them in your conversations in English.