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Adjectives - Part 2

Adjectives - Part 2

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Requirements

Adjectives

Part 2-Adjectives before nouns



Hello! In this lesson, we will learn a new manner to use adjectives. Remember that adjectives are words which modify nouns or pronouns. Adjectives give us more information about a noun or a pronoun.

We have already encountered adjectives in previous lessons, so let us now look at some sentences with which you should be familiar.

In the sentence “The woman is beautiful.” , the word “beautiful” is an adjective. This word gives us more information about “the woman”.

Likewise, if we replace the noun, the woman, with a pronoun, the sentence becomes “She is beautiful.”. Again, the word “beautiful' is an adjective and gives us more information about whomever is refered to by the pronoun “she”, which in this case is “the woman”.

In all the examples of adjectives that we have seen in previous lessons, the sentence has followed the now familiar word order of noun or pronoun-conjugated form of the verb “to be”-adjective.

This form works well for simple sentences, but we will often wish to convey more information in a sentence. Let us look at the following two sentences:

“The woman is beautiful.” and “The woman is hungry.” Each of these sentences gives us information about the subject of the sentence, in this case: the woman. Although it is perfectly acceptable to state each sentence one after the other to provide all of the information, it is very common to combine the adjectives from both sentences into one sentence which would be:

“The beautiful woman is hungry.” Notice how the adjective “beautiful” is placed directly before the noun that it modifies, in this case “woman”. The adjective that appears directly before the noun is used to differentiate the noun from others in its group, while the following adjective is used to provide more information about that noun.

For example, in this example the word “beautiful” is used to differentiate “the woman” from all other women and the adjective “hungry” gives us more information about that specific woman. This sentence could also be constructed as “The hungry woman is beautiful.”

This sentence has a slightly different meaning than the first sentence. In this example the word “hungry” is used to differentiate “the woman” from all other women and the adjective “beautiful” gives us more information about that specific woman.

Let us look at another example with the following two sentences:
“ The dog is fast.” and “The dog is brown.” Each of these sentences gives us information about the subject of the sentence, in this case: the dog. Although it is perfectly acceptable to state each sentence one after the other to provide all of the information, it is very common to combine the adjectives from both sentences into one sentence which would be:

“The brown dog is fast.” Notice how the adjective “brown” is placed directly before the noun that it modifies. The adjective that appears directly before the noun is used to differentiate the noun from others in its group, while the following adjective is used to provide more information about that noun.

For example, in this example the word “brown” is used to differentiate “the dog” from all other dogs and the adjective “fast” gives us more information about that specific dog. This sentence could also be constructed as “The fast dog is brown.”

This sentence has a slightly different meaning than the first sentence. In this example the word “fast” is used to differentiate “the dog” from all other dogs and the adjective “brown” gives us more information about that specific dog.

Let us now look at several more examples of combining two sentences into one sentence. In each of the following examples, we will first see how information may be presented in two sentences, and then how that same information may be combined into one sentence.


“The man is tired.” and “The man is tall.” may be combined to form

“The tall man is tired.” or “The tired man is tall.” depending on the exact meaning that is desired.

“The house is blue.” and “The house is big.” may be combined to form

“The blue house is big.” or “The big house is blue.” depending on the exact meaning that is desired.

“The car is red.” and “The car is old.” may be combined to form “The red car is old.” or “The old car is red.” depending on the exact meaning that is desired.


Adjectives may be used in questions as well as declarative statements, allowing us to find out more information about people or things. For example, in the simple question “Are you happy?”, the adjective is “happy”. This question asks someone whether their present state is one of happiness.

Let us now look at examples of combining two simple questions into one. This is exactly the same as combining two declarative statements into one in the manner that we have just learned.


The two questions “Is the woman beautiful?” and “Is the woman tired?” may be combined to form “Is the beautiful woman tired?” The adjective that appears directly before the noun is used to differentiate the noun from others in its group, while the following adjective is used to provide more information about that noun.

For example, in this example the word “beautiful” is used to differentiate “the woman” from all other women and the adjective “tired” asks for more information about that specific woman. This question could also be constructed as “Is the tired woman beautiful?” This question has a slightly different meaning than the first question. In this example the word “tired” is used to differentiate “the woman” from all other women and the adjective “beautiful” asks for more information about that specific woman.


The two questions “Is the dog brown?” and “Is the dog fast?” may be combined to form “Is the brown dog fast?” The adjective that appears directly before the noun is used to differentiate the noun from others in its group, while the following adjective is used to provide more information about that noun. For example, in this example the word “brown” is used to differentiate “the dog” from all other dogs and the adjective “fast” asks for more information about that specific dog. This question could also be constructed as “Is the fast dog brown?” This question has a slightly different meaning than the first question. In this example the word “fast” is used to differentiate “the dog” from all other dogs and the adjective “brown” asks for more information about that specific dog.

Now that you have a basic understanding of combining two related sentences with adjectives, it is your turn to practice speaking in English.