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Countries and Nationalities - Part 2

Countries and Nationalities - Part 2

 

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Countries and Nationalities – 2

 

Hello! In this lesson, we will continue our study of countries, nationalities, and the adjectives which refer to those countries.  In a previous lesson, we learned some of the most common ways of making adjectives from country names, and we learned the words for the people from those countries. In this lesson, we will learn some of the other ways of forming adjectives from the names of countries.

Some of the adjectives and words for people are formed by adding the suffix "-i" to a form of the name of the country. The plural form of the name for the people from these countries adds an "-s" to the singular. Here is a list of exemplars of that pattern:

" Country                                  Person                                  

Adjective

Bahrain                                            Bahraini, -s                        

Bahraini

Iraq                                            Iraqi, -s                                  

Iraqi

Israel                                            Israeli, -s                        

Israeli

Kuwait                                            Kuwaiti, -s                        

Kuwaiti

Oman                                            Omani, -s                        

Omani

Pakistan                                  Pakistani, -s                        Pakistani

Yemen                                            Yemeni, -s                        

Yemeni"

One group of adjectives consists of one-syllable words. The plurals of the names for the people from these countries are also one-syllable words.  Here is a list of exemplars of this pattern:

"Country                                            Person                     

            Adjective
Czech Republic                                            Czech, -s                                  Czech
France                                            Frenchman, Frenchwoman               

French
                                                     French

Greece                                                      Greek, -s                        

Greek

Switzerland                                            Swiss                                  Swiss
Thailand                                            Thai, -s                                  

Thai

Wales                                            Welshman, Welshwoman              

Welsh"
                                                     Welsh

Most countries whose names end with the word "Island" use the word "Islander" in the names of their people. We add the suffix "-s" to the word "Islander" to form the plural of these names. Here are some exemplars of that pattern:

"Country                                            Person                     

                      Adjective
Cook Islands                                            Cook Islander, -s           

            Cook Island             

Falkland Islands                                            Falkland Islander, -s           

            Falkland Island

Marshall Islands                        Marshallese or Marshall Islander, -s              

Marshall Island

U.S. Virgin Islands                                  U.S. Virgin Islander, -s                        -- "


Some countries are completely different:
"Country                                            Person                                            Adjective
Iceland                                                      Icelander, -s                                  Icelandic
Scotland                                            Scot, Scottish                                  Scottish, Scots, Scotch
                                                     Scot, -s
Scotch (used mostly for whiskey)             

The Seychelles                                            Seychellois                                  Seychellois"


Now that we have learned how to form the adjectives from these country names and the names of people from these countries, let us listen to the dialog.

David:               Should we buy food and drinks for the international visitors?

Jennifer:  Not for the reception, but we are taking some visitors to a restaurant, so we should buy there.

David:  We are taking the Welsh and the U.S. Virgin Islanders to the restaurant, aren't we?

Jennifer:  And we are meeting Mr. and Mrs. Smith at the restaurant.

David: Who are they bringing?

Jennifer:  They are bringing an Icelander and a Scot.

David:  So will the Icelander and the Scot drink Scotch on ice?

Jennifer:  Oh, David.

David:  Just asking.

Now that we have heard the dialog, let us take a closer look at the sentences in the dialog.

After David asks Jennifer about their responsibilities toward the international visitors, he asks "We are taking the Welsh and the U.S. Virgin Islanders to restaurant, aren't we?" Since David used the word "Welsh" rather than "Welshman" or "Welshwoman", we know that he is referring to more than one person from Wales, and since he used the word "Islanders". Which is a plural form, we know that there will be more than one person from the U.S. Virgin Islands.

After David learns that Mr. and Mrs. Smith will be bringing some international visitors to the restaurant also, Jennifer explains that "They are bringing an Icelander and a Scot.". In this case, we know that there will be only one "Icelander" because there is no "-s" at the end of the word to form the plural, and only one "Scot" because there is no "-s" at the end of the word to form the plural.

David then makes a pun when he says "So will the Icelander and the Scot drink Scotch on ice?". David thinks it is funny when he plays with the words "ice" and "Icelander", and with the words "Scotch" and "Scot". The word "Scotch" can be used to talk about a person from Scotland, but it is most often used to talk about "Scotch whiskey". David thinks it is funny to mix these words in one sentence.

When Jennifer gives a pained look and moans at the pun, she says "Oh, David." David replies "Just asking.". The full sentence would be "I was just asking." or "I am just asking.".

Now that we have heard some of the nationalities in the dialog, let us listen to the dialog again. Listen for singular and plural forms. Near the end of the dialog, listen for David's pun.

David:               Should we buy food and drinks for the international visitors?

Jennifer:  Not for the reception, but we are taking some visitors to a restaurant, so we should buy there.

David:  We are taking the Welsh and the U.S. Virgin Islanders to the restaurant, aren't we?

Jennifer:  And we are meeting Mr. and Mrs. Smith at the restaurant.

David: Who are they bringing?

Jennifer:  They are bringing an Icelander and a Scot.

David:  So will the Icelander and the Scot drink Scotch on ice?

Jennifer:  Oh, David.

David:  Just asking.

Very good! Now we have learned many country names, nationality names, and adjectives with which we can discuss countries and people from those countries. Include these words in your English conversations!