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Going to the Doctor - Part 2

Going to the Doctor - Part 2

 

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Going to the doctor – 2


Hello! In this lesson, we will continue practicing English for going to the doctor. In another lesson, we have learned to make a doctor's appointment and to arrive at the doctor's office and speak to the receptionist and the nurse.

The doctor usually knocks on the door before entering the examination room. You may answer "yes" or give no answer at all. It is more an alert that the doctor is entering than a request to enter. In this scenario, the doctor is knocking on the door to the exam room.

Doctor: (Knock on door)

Jennifer: Yes

Doctor: Hello, I'm Doctor Kane.

Jennifer: How do you do. I’m Jennifer Jones.

Doctor: So you've had a headache and sore throat for a couple days?

Jennifer: Yes, my throat feels raw and swollen.

Doctor: Let me take a look. Say ahh.

Jennifer: Ahh.

Doctor: Your throat is red. Let me look in your ears.

Jennifer: Okay.

Doctor: Do you have an earache? Your ears are infected.

Jennifer: Yes, my ears hurt too.

Doctor: I want you to swallow some water while I feel your throat and glands. Take a sip.

Jennifer (sipping water)

Doctor: Another .. another .. … (palpating)

Jennifer: (cough cough)

Doctor: Let me listen to your lungs. (stethoscope) Breathe normally. (listening to back)

Jennifer: (breathing)

Doctor: Cough for me please.

Jennifer: (cough)

Doctor: Take a deep breath. … another … another … Your lungs are clear.

(Jennifer taking deep breaths as directed)

Doctor: Pressing sinuses.

Jennifer: Ow

Doctor: Your sinuses are involved. Do you have any drug allergies?

Jennifer: I'm allergic to sulfa.

Doctor: You have a sinus and ear infection. I'm going to write you a prescription for an antibiotic. I want you to take this twice a day for seven days. You should be taking acetaminophen every two hours for pain. Do you have any questions?

Jennifer: Why do I have a headache and sore throat?

Doctor: You have a sinus infection. I think you're experiencing some drainage that is irritating your throat. The antibiotic should take care of it. Would you like me to prescribe a nasal spray to speed that up?

Jennifer: No.

Doctor: Okay then. You should stay home from work for 24 hours. Get some rest, drink plenty of fluids to flush this out of your system. Are you going to be able to do that?

Jennifer: Yes, thanks.

Doctor: If this doesn't go away in a week, I want to see you back here, okay?

Jennifer: Okay.

Doctor: Otherwise we're done here.

Jennifer: Thank you. (extends hand)

Doctor: (shakes hand) Bye now.

Jennifer: Bye, thanks.

The doctor enters the examination room and introduces herself. She says "Hello, I'm Doctor Kane.". Jennifer responds by saying "How do you do.", a common introductory greeting. Jennifer might also have said "Glad to meet you." or "I'm pleased to meet you." just as she would say in a social situation.

The doctor has read the notes that the nurse took, and she starts the conversation by saying "So you've had a headache and sore throat for a couple days?". She might also have asked Jennifer to describe her symptoms. She might have said "Can you describe your symptoms?", "Please tell me what brings you here today." or "What has been going on?". If she asks "What has been going on?" she means that Jennifer should describe what has been going on with her health.

Jennifer says "Yes, my throat feels raw and swollen.". She could have said "I've had a sore throat." or 'It hurts to swallow.".

The doctor replies "Let me take a look.". She intends to look in Jennifer's throat. She might have said "I'll look in your throat." or "Open up, let me take a look.". or "Open your mouth so I can look at your throat.". She then directs Jennifer to say "ahh.". She wants Jennifer to open her mouth wide and say "ahh".

Jennifer opens her mouth and says "ahh" while the doctor looks in her throat.

The doctor says "Your throat is red and swollen. Let me look in your ears.". She might say "I'm going to look in your ears." Jennifer agrees by saying "okay".

The doctor asks "Do you have an earache?". She might ask "Do your ears hurt?" or "How about your ears? Do they hurt?" or "Have you been having any ear pain?". She says "Your ears are infected.". She might have said "You have an ear infection." or "There's some infection in your ears.".

Jennifer responds "Yes, my ears hurt too.". She could have said "Yes, I've been having some popping noises in my ears." or "yes, I've had an earache too." or "Yes my ears have been sore too." or "No, my ears don’t hurt." Or "I haven't had an earache.".

The doctor says "I want you to swallow some water while I feel your throat and glands. Take a sip.". She might also have said "Take some small sips of water while I palpate your throat and glands.". A "sip" of water is a tiny drink. The doctor wants Jennifer to take (translate: small sips) rather than a large drink.

The doctor then says "Let me listen to your lungs.". She might also say "I'm going to listen to your lungs.". Some doctors try to warm the stethosope with their hands before placing it on your bare skin. Some might say "This is going to be cold." or "You are going to feel something cold on your back.". The doctor gives Jennifer a series of directives: "Breathe normally.", "Cough.", "Take a deep breath.". Sometimes the doctor might say "Take a deep breath and hold it." or "Take a deep breath and let it out slowly." or "Take a deep breath and exhale slowly." or "Take a deep breath with your mouth open." or "Open your mouth and take a deep breath.". Sometimes the doctor might instruct you to take a series of small breaths. The doctor might "Pant like dog." or "Pant like a puppy.". or "Take several shallow breaths.".

The doctor says "Your lungs are clear." She might say "Your lungs sound good." or "I don’t hear any rattles in your lungs.". She might say "Your lungs sound normal.". What if your lungs sounded bad? She might say "I hear a rattle in your lungs." or "We might need to get a chest X-ray – it sounds like you have some lung involvement.".
Before the doctor presses your sinuses she might say "I'm going to press your sinuses." or "I want to know if your sinuses are tender." or "Let me press around your eyes to see if your sinuses are infected.". This hurts Jennifer, so she says "Ow.".

The doctor says "Your sinuses are involved.". She might have said "You have a sinus infection." or "Your sinuses are infected.". She checks on Jennifer's drug allergies. She says "Do you have any drug allergies?". She might have asked "Are you allergic to any antibiotics?" (translate: antibiotics) or "Are you allergic to any drugs?" or "Are you allergic to any medicines?" or simply "Do you have any allergies?".

Jennifer responds "I'm allergic to sulfa." She could say "I have an allergy to sulfa." or "I've had reactions to sulfa in the past.". The doctor might ask "What happens?". The doctor wants to know what happens when Jennifer reacts to the drug. In that case, Jennifer might say "I get hives.", "My throat swells up." or "I cannot breathe when I take sulfa.".

The doctor explains what she is going to do and what Jennifer should do: "You have a sinus and ear infection. I'm going to write you a prescription for an antibiotic. I want you to take this twice a day for seven days. You should be taking acetaminophen every four hours for pain. Do you have any questions?". Jennifer could ask "Could you write that down for me?" or "I would feel more comfortable if you could write that down.". or "I don’t exactly understand. Could you explain it again?". Or "Please tell me again.".

Jennifer asks "Why do I have a headache and sore throat?". She could have said "I don’t understand why I have a headache and sore throat.". She might have asked "Why do my head and throat hurt?" or she might say "What is the diagnosis?" or "I do not understand the diagnosis.".

The doctor explains "You have a sinus infection. I think you're experiencing some drainage that is irritating your throat. The antibiotic should take care of it. Would you like me to prescribe a nasal spray to speed that up?" When the doctor says "The antibiotic should take care of it." She means that the antibiotic will probably stop the drainage that is irritating Jennifer's throat.

The doctor then tells Jennifer "You should stay home from work for 24 hours. Get some rest, drink plenty of fluids to flush this out of your system. Are you going to be able to do that?" She wants Jennifer to stay home from work for 24 hours. She wants her to rest and drink plenty of fluids. She verifies that Jennifer will be able to follow her directions by asking "Are you going to be able to do that?".

Jennifer agrees that she can do it. If there were some reason that she would not be able to follow the directions, she could say "No, I can't.". Maybe Jennifer needs a note from her doctor in order to stay home from work. She could say "I need a note for work." or "Can you write a note for work?".

The doctor then says "If this doesn't go away in a week, I want to see you back here, okay?". She might also say "Come back in a week if this doesn't go away, okay?". She might have said "This should go away within a week. If it doesn't, come back and see me.".

The doctor and Jennifer close the conversation. Jennifer thanks the doctor and extends her hand to shake the doctor's hand. Some doctors shake hands, but some doctors do not. Some doctors might put a hand on your shoulder or arm as a gesture of kindness as they say goodbye.

Wonderful! You have practiced the English associated with going to the doctor. "Get well soon."