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Emotions

Emotions

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Requirements

Emotions


Hello! In this lesson, we will learn how to describe emotions in English. In a previous lesson, we learned the adjectives "happy, sad, mad, angry, good, tired, rested," and "bad".

We can express our emotions and physical feelings and discuss the emotions and physical feelings of other people using these adjectives and the conjugated verbs "to be" and "to feel". In a previous lesson, we learned that we can ask "How are you?"

A common answer is "I am fine." In the answer "I am fine.", the word "fine" is an adjective which tells how the person feels. Similarly, we can say "I am mad.", "I am angry.", or "I am happy."

Another way to ask about the emotions of others is to ask "How do you feel?" A possible answer might be "I feel happy." or "I feel angry.". Another possible way to answer the question "How do you feel?" might be "I am happy." or "I am angry.".

Adjectives are neither formal nor informal, neither masculine nor feminine in their grammatical form. Adjectives maintain the same form when they are used to refer to one person or to more than one person.

In the dialog, Jennifer and David are discussing David's boss, Mr. Johnson.

Jennifer:   How is Mr. Johnson?

David:  He is not happy.

Jennifer: Is he mad?

David:  Yes, he is angry.

Jennifer: Work is difficult. How do you feel?

David: I feel tired. Work is not easy.

Jennifer: I understand.  Work is hard.

David: How are you?

Jennifer: I am not angry. I am not sad. I feel happy.

David: Good.  You and I are happy. We are happy.

Now that we have a basic understanding of how we express emotions in English, let us take a look at the questions and answers in more detail.

In the context of a discussion about David's job, Jennifer asks "How is Mr. Johnson?" We learned in a previous lesson that a possible answer to the question would be "Mr. Johnson is fine." or "He is fine."

David answers "He is not happy.", telling Jennifer about Mr. Johnson's emotional state. In a previous lesson, we learned thatadjectives may be used in questions as well as declarative statements, allowing us to find outmore information about people or things.

For example, in the statement "He is not happy.",theadjective is “happy”. This question asks whether his present state is happiness. Wemay simply change adjectives in declarative statements or questions in order to state or discern whatever additional information we seek in the conversation.

For example, Jennifer asks "Is he mad?" In this question, the adjective is "mad".  Jennifer could have changed adjectives in her question. She could have asked "Is he sad?" or "Is he angry?".David answers "Yes, he is angry."

David could have substituted the verb "to feel." He could have answered "Yes, he feels angry." Or he might have answered "Yes, he feels mad." or "Yes, he is mad.".

During the conversation about David's job, David asks Jennifer "How are you?" While the question "How are you?" is a typical greeting, in this case, David is asking the question in the context of this particular conversation. Since they are discussing David's boss's emotions, in this case, David is inquiring into Jennifer's emotions.

Jennifer answers "I am not angry. I am not sad. I feel happy." Notice that Jennifer uses the verbs "to be” and "to feel" interchangeably.  Instead of saying "I feel happy.", she could also have said "I am happy."

In the last sentence of the dialog, David says, "You and I are happy. We are happy." Notice that the conjugated verb "are" is used because of the personal pronouns "You and I" and "We". David might have used any other adjective in the sentence. For example, he could have said, "You and I are sad." or "You and I are angry."  He might have said "We are sad." or "We are angry." He could have substituted the verb "to feel" and might have said "You and I feel happy." or "We feel happy."

In all these circumstances, the adjectives keep the same form, while the verbs "to be" and "to feel" make changes according to the noun or personal pronoun that is used.

Now that we have a good grasp of expressing emotions and physical states in English, let us listen to the dialog again. Listen for the changing forms of the verbs and the unchanging forms of the adjectives.

Jennifer:   How is Mr. Johnson?

David:  He is not happy.

Jennifer:  Is he mad?

David:  Yes, he is angry.

Jennifer:  Work is difficult. How do you feel?

David:  I feel tired. Work is not easy.

Jennifer:  I understand.  Work is hard.

David: How are you?

Jennifer: I am not angry. I am not sad. I feel happy.

David: Good.  You and I are happy. We are happy.

Great work! Now that you know some structures for expressing and inquiring about emotions and physical feelings in English, it is time to incorporate these important structures into your English conversations.