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Also - Too

Also - Too

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Also – Too


Hello! In this lesson we will learn to use the words "also" and "too".  The words have the same meaning, but they are generally used in different places in a sentence. Both words are used to mean:  in addition to.  The word "also" usually goes before the conjugated verb or right after the conjugated verb "to be".  The word "too" usually goes at the end of the phrase or sentence.  Here are some examples of the way the two words are used.

If we want to say that we like both rice and noodles, using the word "too", we can say "I like noodles. I like rice too." . Using the word "also", we can say "I like noodles. I also like rice." Using the verb "to be", we might say "I am hungry. I am thirsty too." We might say "I am hungry. I am also thirsty."

If a friend says that he likes noodles, and we agree with our friend, after my friend says "I like noodles.", we can say "I like noodles, too.". Using the word "also", after our friend says "I like noodles", we can say "I also like noodles.". Using the verb "to be", our friend might say "I am hungry.". We might add "I am hungry too." or  "I am also hungry.".

When we use the word "too", we often use some special phrasing which makes the phrases shorter.

If our friend says "I like noodles." We might say, "I like noodles too.". To shorten the phrase, we can say "I do too."  An even shorter way to say it is "Me too.".

If our friend says "I like noodles." and we wish to add that another person likes noodles too, We might say "Jennifer likes noodles, too", or we might say "She does too.". We do not shorten the phrase any more than that.

Using the verb "to be", our friend might say "I am hungry.". We can add "I am hungry too," or we can say "I am too.". An even shorter way to say it is "Me too."

Using the verb "to be", we might wish to add that another person is hungry too. After the friend says "I am hungry", we can add "Jennifer is too.".

Now that you have an idea of the usage of "also" and "too", listen to the dialog. David and Jennifer have just come home after a hard day at work. They are hungry and thirsty. Pay attention to the placement of the words "also" and "too". Pay particular attention to the way the ways in which the sentences are shortened when we use "too".

David: I am hungry.

Jennifer: I am too.   

David:  I want some rice.

Jennifer: I do too. I also want some vegetables.

David: I am thirsty. I need some water.

Jennifer: Me too.

David:  My rice tastes good.

Jennifer: Mine does too.

In the first sentence, David says "I am hungry." Jennifer answers "I am too.". Her response is a short way of saying "I am hungry too.".She could have said "Me too.".She could have used "also" and could have said "I am also hungry.".

Notice that the word "too" comes at the end of the phrase or sentence. If she had used "also", the word "also" would have come right after the conjugated form of "to be" which in this case is "am". "I am also hungry.".

Next David says "I want some rice.". Jennifer answers "I do too.". Her response is a short way of saying "I want some rice too.".She could have said "Me too.". She could have used "also" and could have said "I also want some rice.".

Then Jennifer says "I also want some vegetables.".She could have said "I want some vegetables too.".

After David says "I am thirsty. I need some water.", Jennifer says "Me too.".She could have said "I am thirsty too. I need some water too.". She could have said "I am thirsty, too. I also need some water." or she could have answered the last part of David's statement by saying " I do too.", which means "I need some water too.".

After David says "My rice tastes good.", Jennifer answers "Mine does too.". She could have said "My rice tastes good too." or "My rice also tastes good.".

Notice that the construction of the short forms depends on the verb in the sentence which is being added to. If the verb is a conjugated form of "to be", the agreement phrase must have a conjugated form of "to be." For example, "He is happy. She is too." means "He is happy. She is happy too."  "We are happy. They are too." means "We are happy. They are happy too.",  "She is happy. We are too." means "She is happy. We are happy too.".  If the conjugated form is a form of a different verb, the agreement phrase will be "do" for verbs without an "s" at the end. It will be "does" for verbs with an "s" at the end. For example, "I like fish. He does too." This means "I like fish. He likes fish too.". Since the conjugated verb "likes" has an "s" at the end, the agreement word "does" has an "s" at the end. "He likes fish. I do too."  means  the same as "He likes fish. I like fish too.". Since the verb in the agreement sentence has no "s" at the end, the agreement word is "do." "I do too."

Now that you have a good understanding of the use of "too" and "also" and their use in sentences, listen to the dialog again. Listen for the changing verb forms as Jennifer and David speak.

David: I am hungry.

Jennifer: I am too.   

David:  I want some rice.

Jennifer: I do too. I also want some vegetables.

David: I am thirsty. I need some water.

Jennifer: Me too.

David:  My rice tastes good.

Jennifer: Mine does too.

Great! Now that you know the words "too" and "also" along with the changing verb forms that go with "too", you have learned some powerful concepts that will help in your English fluency. Reinforce these ideas and usages in your mind and begin using them in your English conversations.