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Verbs - Have, Need, Must

Verbs - Have, Need, Must

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Requirements

Auxilary Verbs

Part 1- have, need, must



Hello! In this lesson, we will learn how to use auxilary verbs in English. Remember that verbs are words that usually denote an action, but may occasionally denote an occurrence , or a state of being. An auxilary verb is a verb functioning to give further information about the main verb following it.

For the purposes of this lesson we will only be focusing on the verbs “have”, “need”, and “must” in the present tense. When used as auxilary verbs, each of these three verbs conveys the exact same meaning, which is one of necessity.

Let us start by looking at an example of using the auxilary verb “have” to indicate necessity. We may say “I have to go.” The auxilary verb “have” before the infinitive form “to go” indicates that there is a necessity “to go”.

In general, we indicate necessity of an action by placing the verb “have” before the infinitive form of any other verb. Remember that to form the infinitive of the verb, we simply place the word “to” in front of the unconjugated form of the verb.

Another example of using the auxilary verb “have” is “We have to leave.” The auxilary verb “have” before the infinitive form “to leave” indicates that there is a necessity “to leave”. It is also possible to use negation with the auxilary verb “have” to indicate the necessity of not undertaking an action. For example, we may say “I have to not eat.” The addition of the word “not” before the verb “eat” implies that there is a necessity to not “eat”.

The auxilary verb “need” is also used to indicate necessity in the exact same manner that “have” is used. There is no difference in the use of “need” and “have” when used as auxilary verbs to indicate the necessity of an action. For example, we may say “I need to go.” The auxilary verb “need” before the infinitive form “to go” indicates that there is a necessity “to go”.

We may indicate necessity of an action by placing the verb “need” before the infinitive form of any other verb. Remember that to form the infinitive of the verb, we simply place the word “to” in front of the unconjugated form of the verb. Another example of using the auxilary verb “need” is “We need to leave.”

The auxilary verb “need” before the infinitive form “to leave” indicates that there is a necessity “to leave”. It is also possible to use negation with the auxilary verb “need” to indicate the necessity of not undertaking an action. For example, we may say “I need to not swim.” The addition of the word “not” before the verb “swim” implies that there is a necessity to not “swim”.

The last auxilary verb we will learn in this lesson is “must”. This auxilary verb has the exact same meaning as “have” and “need”, and is used in almost the exact same manner. The only difference in using “must” is that the we omit the word “to” between the auxilary verb “must” and the main verb. For example, we may say “I must go.”

The auxilary verb “must” before the verb “go” indicates that there is a necessity to “go”. We may indicate necessity of an action by placing the verb “must” before any other verb. Another example of using the auxilary verb “must” is “We must leave.” The auxilary verb “must” before the infinitive form “to leave” indicates that there is a necessity to “leave”. It is also possible to use negation with the auxilary verb “must” to indicate the necessity of not undertaking an action. For example, we may say “I must not go.” The addition of the word “not” before the verb “go” implies that there is a necessity to not “go”.

Let us now listen to a simple dialog to examine the use of these auxilary verbs. In this dialog, Jennifer and David are at a restaurant.


Jennifer: Are you hungry?

David: Yes, I am hungry. I must eat.

Jennifer: I like vegetables. I have to order a salad.

David: I need to eat beef.

Jennifer: I must not eat beef. I need to eat vegetables.


Let us now examine this dialog in more detail.
After David tells Jennifer that he is hungry, he says “I must eat.” This indicates that it is necessary for David “to eat”.

Then Jennifer expresses her preference for vegetables and says “I have to order a salad.” which indicates that it is necessary for Jennifer “to order a salad”.

David responds “I need to eat beef.” which indicates that it is necessary for David “to eat beef”. Finally, Jennifer responds “I must not eat beef.” which indicates the necessity to “not eat beef” and she reinforces this idea when she says “I need to eat vegetables.” which indicates the necessity “to eat vegetables.”


Let us now listen once more to this simple dialog, paying special attention to the use of the auxilary verbs “have”, “need”, and “must”.


Jennifer: Are you hungry?

David: Yes, I am hungry. I must eat.

Jennifer: I like vegetables. I have to order a salad.

David: I need to eat beef.

Jennifer: I must not eat beef. I need vegetables.



Now that you have learned how to use the auxillary verbs "have", "need", and "must", it is your turn to practice speaking in English.