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Review Lesson 13

Review Lesson 13

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Review Lesson 13


Hello! We have learned a lot in these last few lessons. Let us take a moment to review what we have learned.

First, we learned how to form the possessive using nouns and names using an apostrophe and the letter "s" with a noun or name to show possession. To show possession with a singular noun, we add "-'s" to the noun. For example, we might say "This is the man's car." To make a name possessive, we add "-'s" to the name. For example, we might say "Mrs. Smith's car is bigger than David's car." To show possession with a plural noun which ends in s, we simply add an apostrophe – "-' " to the end of the word. For example, we might say "These are the students' pencils." To show possession with irregular plural forms, like "men, women," and "children", we add "-'s" to the word. For example, we would say "These are the men's cars." In this case, there are more than one man and more than one car. The simplest way of showing possession with nouns which end with "–s" or "-ss" is to just add "-'s". For example, "Jennifer is James's cousin.". However, some people prefer to leave the possessive "s" off words than end in "s". So you might also read something like "Jennifer is James' cousin." The meaning is the same. We also learned that we can ask about possession of something by using the question word "whose". For example, we can ask "Whose car is red?" The answer would be "Mrs. Smith's car is red."

Finally, we learned to change some adjectives to adverbs. The process of forming an adverb from an adjective is often accomplished by adding -ly to the end of the adjective, such as the adjective “sad” and the adverb “sadly”. To form adverbs from adjectives that end in "y", we change the "y' to "i" and add "ly", such as the adjective “happy” and the adverb “happily”. For adjectives that end in "-ful", we double the "l" and add "y", such as the adjective “beautiful” and the adverb “beautifully”. For adjectives that end in a vowel followed by "e", we take away the "e" and add "ly", such as the adjective “true” and the adverb “truly”. We also learned about the adverbs “hard”, “fast”, “well”, and “very”.

 

Great! Now that you have reviewed each of these concepts, you have reinforced the knowledge you have learned thus far.